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13

Jul

mightyquinn72:

My spirit animal.

“I go, you stay, no following.”
“I love you”
“You are who you choose to be”
“Superman”

mightyquinn72:

My spirit animal.

“I go, you stay, no following.”
“I love you”
“You are who you choose to be”
“Superman”

kayyllaacole:

Iron Giant

kayyllaacole:

Iron Giant

09

Jun

12

Mar

laughingsquid:

Explore, A Discovery Engine for Meaningful Knowledge by Maria Popova
laughingsquid:

Aereo, Watch & Record Broadcast TV on Web-Enabled Devices
poptech:

Redesigning Reality: How 3-D Printing Is Shaping the Future of Art, Engineering, and Everything Else | Artinfo

Two interesting things happened this year. First, doctors in Belgium performed the country’s first face transplant. Second, Asher Levine, a young avant-garde fashion designer for the likes of Lady Gaga,  produced a pair of radical sunglasses on-site during his New York  Fashion Week show. What do a surgical procedure and a line of shades  have in common? Both were made possible by additive manufacturing, also  known as 3-D printing or rapid prototyping, a technique whose quickly  expanding accessibility may have as much of a revolutionary influence on  how we relate to manufactured objects as Ford’s assembly line.
It’s a space-age sounding process: The same way a printer produces a  document based on a computer file, additive manufacturing devices create  made-to-order objects based on a CAD file. There are a few variations  to the technique, but they all operate by building an object layer by  individual layer in a single process. Some 3-D printers pipe melted  plastic through a nozzle in a process called fused deposition modeling  (FDM); higher-tech methods, like stereolithography (SLA) run lasers  through a vat of powdered material — metals, nylons, concretes —  solidifying anything they touch; and then there’s selective laser  sintering (SLS), which similarly runs a laser through a resin and  solidifies it into a single object by binding each layer together. All  of these allow for the creation of extraordinary complex designs with  extraordinary ease for the average person.
Hailing from the 1980s, the technology isn’t exactly new, but it has  been making inroads lately in both art and engineering, being used to  manufacture prosthetic limbs, car parts, furniture, and jewelry. It’s  also subject of “Print/3D,” an exhibition of objects at New York’s Material ConneXion that opened this week. “3-D Printing breaks away barriers in design  that are challenged by the constraints of standard manufacturing or  manual production,” show curator Susan Towers told ARTINFO. While the process still has some definite kinks to be worked out, it’s already being put to revolutionary use.

To see objects manufactured by Shapeways, Materialise, and MakerBot, click the slide show, or visit Material ConneXion’s ”Print/3D,” on view through May 11. 

poptech:

Redesigning Reality: How 3-D Printing Is Shaping the Future of Art, Engineering, and Everything Else | Artinfo

Two interesting things happened this year. First, doctors in Belgium performed the country’s first face transplant. Second, Asher Levine, a young avant-garde fashion designer for the likes of Lady Gaga, produced a pair of radical sunglasses on-site during his New York Fashion Week show. What do a surgical procedure and a line of shades have in common? Both were made possible by additive manufacturing, also known as 3-D printing or rapid prototyping, a technique whose quickly expanding accessibility may have as much of a revolutionary influence on how we relate to manufactured objects as Ford’s assembly line.

It’s a space-age sounding process: The same way a printer produces a document based on a computer file, additive manufacturing devices create made-to-order objects based on a CAD file. There are a few variations to the technique, but they all operate by building an object layer by individual layer in a single process. Some 3-D printers pipe melted plastic through a nozzle in a process called fused deposition modeling (FDM); higher-tech methods, like stereolithography (SLA) run lasers through a vat of powdered material — metals, nylons, concretes — solidifying anything they touch; and then there’s selective laser sintering (SLS), which similarly runs a laser through a resin and solidifies it into a single object by binding each layer together. All of these allow for the creation of extraordinary complex designs with extraordinary ease for the average person.

Hailing from the 1980s, the technology isn’t exactly new, but it has been making inroads lately in both art and engineering, being used to manufacture prosthetic limbs, car parts, furniture, and jewelry. It’s also subject of “Print/3D,” an exhibition of objects at New York’s Material ConneXion that opened this week. “3-D Printing breaks away barriers in design that are challenged by the constraints of standard manufacturing or manual production,” show curator Susan Towers told ARTINFO. While the process still has some definite kinks to be worked out, it’s already being put to revolutionary use.

To see objects manufactured by Shapeways, Materialise, and MakerBot, click the slide show, or visit Material ConneXion’s ”Print/3D,” on view through May 11. 

laughingsquid:

Penguin III by Jeremy Mayer

Zap your brain into the zone: Fast track to pure focus

We don’t yet have a commercially available “thinking cap” but we will soon. So the research community has begun to ask: What are the ethics of battery-operated cognitive enhancement? Last week a group of Oxford University neuroscientists released a cautionary statement about the ethics of brain boosting, followed quickly by a report from the UK’s Royal Society that questioned the use of tDCS for military applications. Is brain boosting a fair addition to the cognitive enhancement arms race? Will it create a Morlock/Eloi-like social divide where the rich can afford to be smarter and leave everyone else behind? Will Tiger Moms force their lazy kids to strap on a zappity helmet during piano practice?

After trying it myself, I have different questions. To make you understand, I am going to tell you how it felt. The experience wasn’t simply about the easy pleasure of undeserved expertise. When the nice neuroscientists put the electrodes on me, the thing that made the earth drop out from under my feet was that for the first time in my life, everything in my head finally shut the fuck up.

The experiment I underwent was accelerated marksmanship training on a simulation the military uses. I spent a few hours learning how to shoot a modified M4 close-range assault rifle, first without tDCS and then with. Without it I was terrible, and when you’re terrible at something, all you can do is obsess about how terrible you are. And how much you want to stop doing the thing you are terrible at.

Then this happened:

The 20 minutes I spent hitting targets while electricity coursed through my brain were far from transcendent. I only remember feeling like I had just had an excellent cup of coffee, but without the caffeine jitters. I felt clear-headed and like myself, just sharper. Calmer. Without fear and without doubt. From there on, I just spent the time waiting for a problem to appear so that I could solve it.

poptech:

The MLA has officially devised a standard format to cite tweets in an academic paper. 
(via cmonstah:warbyparker)
staff:

Name ExploreLocation New York

When Benjamin Franklin founded the first subscription library in America, he believed that access to knowledge was the key to creativity, innovation, and success. Today, the web is our library, and Coursekit has teamed up with Maria Popova to find the internet’s most relevant and interesting information and synthesize it into knowledge and insight. From TED talks, to vintage maps, to psychology studies, to quotes from favorite books, Explore is a guide through the landscape of the mind.

Also check out…

WTF QR CODES
Celebrating the ridiculousness that is QR codes.

Break Up Your Band
A blog about cataloguing and dissecting the best music of the 1990s (mostly).

Phenomenal People
A celebration of phenomenal women. Share your story and celebrate the Southbank Centre’s Women of the World Festival in London.

staff:

Name Explore
Location New York

When Benjamin Franklin founded the first subscription library in America, he believed that access to knowledge was the key to creativity, innovation, and success. Today, the web is our library, and Coursekit has teamed up with Maria Popova to find the internet’s most relevant and interesting information and synthesize it into knowledge and insight. From TED talks, to vintage maps, to psychology studies, to quotes from favorite books, Explore is a guide through the landscape of the mind.

Also check out…

WTF QR CODES
Celebrating the ridiculousness that is QR codes.

Break Up Your Band
A blog about cataloguing and dissecting the best music of the 1990s (mostly).

Phenomenal People
A celebration of phenomenal women. Share your story and celebrate the Southbank Centre’s Women of the World Festival in London.